Caravaggio / 2 posts found

Bottega Brera

Shopping at the museum

We all love shopping at the museum: museum shops are full of artistic, contemporary and classic object to combine shopping and culture.

A new venue has been recently opened in Milan inside Brera Museum: “Bottega Brera”, consisting of 86 square meters full of books and design, with plenty of products exclusively designed for the museum. Bottega Brera is accessible from the main courtyard of Brera building and therefore open to anybody, not just visitors to the Picture Gallery.

But Brera is not just an amazing collection of masterpieces, including paintings by Mantegna, Bellini, Tintoretto, and Caravaggio. Brera, established at the end of the XVIII century, was conceived as a citadel of culture, a temple of Enlightment were science and humanities could live side by side. That is why in the same Brera building you may visit not just the pinacotheca but also an Astonomical Observatory, you will stroll along the regular flowerbeds of a Botanical Garden and you’ll browse through the ancient volumes kept in the Braidense Library.

Fornasetti for Brera

Fornasetti for Brera

At Bottega Brera you will find objects reprenting each of such institutions, and even original creations by the students of prestigious Brera Academy of Arts, also housed in this century-old building. Products range from fragrances based on Brera Rose – grown in the Botanical Garden – to Fornasetti tableware created by students of the Academy; from Trussardi limited edition foulards (by the way, Brera custodians wear Trussardi!), to children’s books by Bruno Munari, who opened his first didactic workshop for kids at Brera.

At the end of your visit to the museum and your shopping session at Bottega Brera, treat yourself with a cup of coffee at one of the nice cafès of Brera district. With its streets of cobblestones, fine art galleries, and elegant boutiques, it will be a highlight of your stay in Milan.

Caravaggio

Inside Caravaggio – a new look at the works of a genius

While in Milan, take some time off the tour of the city and visit an exhibit that will change the way you look at the works of one of the greatest painters of all times, Caravaggio.

At Inside Caravaggio“, more than 20 masterpieces on loan from several of most famous museums are exhibited alongside their respective radiographic images, showing what lies beneath the surface of the paintings and revealing the changes that the artist made between draft and final work. But the visitor’s experience will go deeper than that. You will be able to discover the painter’s artistic evolution throughout his work and artistic career, and at the same time follow the events of Caravaggio’s life, as this tormented soul slowly slides towards darkness and despair.

Inside Caravaggio

Inside Caravaggio

Caravaggio made dramatic use of chiaroscuro – the contrast of light and dark in an artwork – that came to be known as tenebrism. In his paintings, shadows were pitch dark and subjects were typically transfixed by bright shafts of light. Caravaggio’s works often features violent struggles, torture and death; he worked rapidly, with live models, preferring to forego drawings and work directly onto the canvas.

Instead of preparatory drawings, the artist would trace rough indications in the first layers of paint with the handle of his brush, and then go right ahead with the rest of his paintings. But as you continue your visit to the exhibition, following the evolution of Caravaggio’s art, you will slowly realise that what you are witnessing is a visual history of his life: from his humble beginnings in his paintings of genre scenes, still-lifes and using himself or his roommate as a model, to his rise to success around 1600, to the darkest of paintings during his last years as a fugitive, having murdered a man. And as the end approaches, look carefully at the technique he is using. He would cover the canvas in a dark colour and then paint his subjects by simply adding the details that were inundated with light. His last paintings are just made of a dark, slightly disturbing background and a few strokes of painbrush applied only where a ray of light hits his models.

Michelangelo Merisi was born in Milan, in 1571. This exhibit is the best homage paid by our city to the genius of this Lombard artist, considered the most revolutionary of his time.